Veges CO - PA

CUCUMBER (Cucumis sativus) and GHERKINS

admin / November 17, 2017

Originally from Asia, where they have been cultivated for at least 3000 years, they were possibly brought to Europe with the help of the Romans. Apparently, there are records of Cucumbers being grown in France in the 9th Century and in England in the 14th Century. Health Benefits. Contains vitamins A, B, C, silica, caffeic acid, lignans. Cucumbers are not the easiest…

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Veges CO - PA

COURGETTE (Cucurbita pepo)

admin / November 17, 2017

Courgettes are part of the group of Summer Squashes from the Americas. They have soft skins and a mild juicy flesh, and will not store for any length of time. They should be used as soon as possible after having been cut, as they do not store well, even in the fridge. Two or three plants are all you are…

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CHINESE CABBAGE (Brassica rapa var. Pekinesis)

admin / November 17, 2017

Chinese cabbages have a long history of being grown in several Asian countries. They are now becoming more frequently grown in the UK, and there are two basic forms. One type is shaped like a very large cos lettuce, with tightly packed yellow leaves with a sweet taste.  Useful in stir fries and salads.They are rather prone to bolting in dry…

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CHICORY (Cichorium intybus) perennial

admin / November 17, 2017

Chicory plants have been popular in Italy since Roman Times, but are fairly new to this Country. There are several varieties available from different parts of Italy such as Treviso, Venice and Verona. One seed catalogue lists some 30 different varieties of chicory with different shapes, sizes and colours. While it is the leaves that are usually eaten, the roots can…

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CHARD (Beta vulgaris cicla group)

admin / November 17, 2017

It is originally from the Mediterranean area and not Switzerland, as it’s common name, Swiss chard, might indicate! It has been suggested that it got the common name after an epidemic of flea beetles ate the leaves so badly that they resembled Swiss cheese! It is a cultivated form of Sea beet It is more edible than spinach as it does not…

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CELERY (Apium graveolens)

admin / November 17, 2017

The wild plant grows in marshy, salt impregnated ground in several parts of the world. The cultivated form needs a long growing season in the North of the UK. Therefore it is probably best sown with a little heat in cells, then transferred to a cold frame before being transplanted to the final growing position in May. I always look…

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Veges A - CH

CELERIAC (Apium graveolens var. rapacium)

admin / November 17, 2017

Probably originally from the Middle East, the edible bulbous root is a cultivar of celery and is very nutritious. It was apparently introduced to the UK in the 1720’s, but has never been as popular here as it is in other Northern European countries. Indeed, I have never come across anyone growing it on our allotments apart from myself. This could…

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CAULIFLOWER (Brassica oleracea Botrytis group)

admin / November 17, 2017

Yet another member of the cabbage family and my favorite. They come in all shapes, sizes and colors and not just the standard white that you may be familiar with. The Cauliflower “curds” that are the part that is usually eaten, are in fact a clump of flower buds. If these are left fully protected from frosts to continue growing, they…

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Veges A - CH

CARROTS (Daucus carota)

admin / November 17, 2017

Originally from Afghanistan and purple in colour, Carrots were grown for their aromatic leaves and seeds rather than their roots. The leaves and seeds were used in a similar manner to that of their relatives such as parsley, fennel and dill. In Europe in the 8th century, red and yellow carrots were known. Then the Dutch bred the orange variety in…

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Veges A - CH

CARDOON (Cynara cardunculus)

admin / November 17, 2017

The Cardoon is a member of the Thistle family, related to the globe artichoke, and grows to about 2 m high. It is the blanched stalks that can be eaten, rather than the flower buds. I have not tried eating the blanched stems, but according to the literature, the end result is not very exiting being rather like eating tough…

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